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Minimum Wage in Nevada in 2023

Last Updated on:

04 January 2023
Minimum Wage in Nevada

On top of the Federal minimum wage, each state in the USA has its own set of laws for minimum wages. But the great thing is even if their state minimum wage is lower than that of the Federal minimum wage, workers are entitled to receive whichever amount is higher according to FLSA or Fair Labor Standards Act.

And like any other state in the US, Nevada has its unique laws surrounding minimum wage that are different from that set by the Federal Government. In this article, we shall explain in detail the minimum wage laws in Nevada and how to calculate them. 

So let's begin!

What is the Minimum Wage in Nevada?

The current minimum wage in Nevada in 2023 is $10.50 hourly, which is about 45% more than the Federal minimum wage of $7.25. 

According to the FLSA, all employees are entitled to receive the highest amount between Federal Minimum Wage and their state minimum wage. So almost all employees in Nevada will receive $10.5 hourly except for a few exemptions.

Exemptions to Nevada Minimum Wage

  • Employees that work in administration
  • Employees who are considered white-collar job holders
  • Individuals who are independent contractors
  • Domestic workers who live in
  • Workers in farms and agriculture
  • Individuals who work as drivers, particularly in taxis and limos
  • Salespersons from a different state
  • Babysitters

Weekly Minimum Wage in Nevada

A state's weekly minimum wage is calculated based on the assumption that an individual employee will work 40 hours per week. Therefore, if an employee or worker in Nevada gets $10.5 per hour, the weekly minimum wage in Nevada is $420.

Yearly Minimum Wage in Nevada

A state's yearly minimum wage is determined based on the assumption that an individual employee will work 40 hours per week for 52 weeks per year. Therefore, an employee or worker in Nevada earns $21,840 per year as minimum wage.

Overtime Minimum Wage in Nevada

According to the Fair Labor Standards Act, all employees who work overtime, or more than 40 hours per week, are entitled to 1.5 times the State or Federal Minimum wage. Therefore, the overtime minimum wage in Nevada is $15.75 per hour for work beyond 40 hours per week.

So, for instance, let's say an employee works 50 hours weekly. So they will earn regular income + overtime income:

40 x $10.5= $420 as regular income,

10 x $15.75= $157.5 as overtime income.

In total, an employee generally working 40 hours per week and earning the minimum wage in Nevada will earn a total of $577.50 for working 50 hours in a single week.

Nevada Overtime Wage Exemptions

  • Employees that are highly compensated, for instance, admins, professionals, and executives
  • Sales employees that are from a different state
  • Employees working in the recreation industry, like amusement and theme parks
  • Certain agricultural workers
  • Taxi drivers
  • Employees working in healthcare institutes
  • Certain employees that work as petroleum distributors

Tipped Minimum Wage in Nevada

The minimum wage for tipped employees in Nevada is $8.75 hourly. However, suppose the total tipped minimum wage and the tips received do not sum up to the standard minimum wage of $10.5 per hour. In that case, the employer is legally obligated to compensate for the difference.

For example: if an employee in Nevada earns a total of $400, of which $350 is from the $8.75 hourly wage and $50 is from tips, then the employer is obligated to pay that individual an additional $70 to make the total weekly earning $420 which is the amount the employee would have earned working at the standard minimum wage in Nevada. 

But if that individual makes anything more than $420 weekly, then the employer doesn't need to pay them anything extra.

How are Wages in Nevada Different?

Here are two instances:

Wages for Tipped Employees

Employees in the state of Nevada who routinely receives tips are referred to as "tipped employees." 

According to the state laws in Nevada, companies are not permitted to pay tipped employees a wage lesser than the standardized hourly wage. The minimum wage for workers who receive tips is either $8.75  or $9.75, depending on whether or not the employer provides health insurance.

Sometimes tip pooling is done so that all employees receive equal amounts of tips and fairly. Tip pooling, also known as tip sharing, is a popular practice for gratuities. Employers in the state of Nevada have the authority to mandate that their staff members engage in tip pools.

Subminimum Wage for Some Employees

Employees with disabilities in Nevada can be hired at lower pay rates. However, as proof of their disability, they must show and submit proof from a credible source like the official government or state-sanctioned hospitals and institutes. 

Young adults under the age of 20 may also get the subminimum wage, which must amount to at least $4.25 an hour.

Additionally, the law stipulates that part-time workers enrolled as students must be paid at least $8.29 hourly because, according to FLSA, they are eligible to receive a minimum wage equivalent to 85% of their state minimum wage.

Except for these three groups of workers, everyone else in Nevada is legally entitled to the state or federal minimum.

Who Qualifies for Minimum Wage?

Federal and state laws in Nevada provide varying minimum wages for different jobs. Some employees may be paid a lesser minimum wage than others.

The following is a list of employees exempt from receiving minimum wage in Nevada. They are;

  • Highly compensated individuals or white collar job holders
  • Taxi and Limo drivers
  • Individuals working in agriculture
  • Babysitters
  • Out of state sales persons
  • Live in Domestic workers.

Other than the employees mentioned above, any worker inside the state  can qualify for the minimum wage in Nevada. 

Historical Change of Minimum Wage in Nevada

The following table illustrates the changes in the minimum wage in Nevada over the years. 

Year

Minimum Wage Amount in USD

2023

10.5

2022

10.5

2021

9.75

2020

9.00

2019

8.25

2018

8.25

2017

8.25

2016

8.25

2015

8.25

2014

8.25

2013

8.25

2012

8.25

2011

8.25

2010

8.25

2009

7.55

2008

6.85

2007

6.15

2006

6.15

2005

5.15

2004

5.15

2003

5.15

2002

5.15

2001

5.15

2000

5.15

1999

5.15

1998

5.15

1997

5.15

1996

4.25

1995

4.25

1994

4.25

1993

4.25

1992

4.25

1991

4.25

1990

3.80

1989

3.35

1988

3.35

1987

3.35

1986

2.75

1985

2.75

FAQ

1. What are Tips? 

According to FLSA and the IRS, tips are anything extra beyond the cost of goods and services that customers give to certain employees or workers during their interaction and exchange. Usually, money is given as tips, and sometimes it is included in the bill/cost of goods and services, in which case it needs to be mentioned with a detailed breakdown.

2. Why do people Tip?

Tipping is often an important social and cultural aspect in some cases. It becomes customary to tip individuals in certain cases, for instance, waiters, delivery personnel, etc., for the service, hospitality, and effort they put in. In certain cultures and social situations, not giving tips is often frowned upon and considered offensive and rude.

3. What is Mini-COBRA Law?

COBRA Law, which gives some employees the option to continue their healthcare benefits after a job loss, usually applies to employers with more than 20 employees. So a lot of the states in the US have adopted their own version of COBRA law for employers with 20 or fewer employees. This is known as Mini-COBRA Law.

4. Does Nevada have its own Mini-Cobra Law?

The answer to that is no, as the state of Nevada never implemented its own Mini-COBRA Laws. But Nevada has done something unique. Instead, they have increased the minimum wage rates for employees who do not receive health insurance from their employers.

5. What is the Subminimum Wage for High-School and College students in Nevada?

The subminimum wage for high-school and college students in Nevada who work part-time is $8.29 per hour.

 


Josh Evan

Written by:

Josh Evan

Josh Evan is the professional career counselor and career development writer at When Work Works. He loves to see people from this field succeed through initiating the right thing in the right way. He never tells; he shows the way. We appointed John not because of his impressive CV. It was his counseling charisma which stood out of everything. He can implant idea, confidence and productive thoughts into mind almost effortlessly. His pen and mouth both speak for the greater good.


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